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GABRG1 Membrane Protein Introduction

Introduction of GABRG1

Gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit gamma-1 (GABRG1), also known as GABA(A) receptor subunit gamma-1, is a protein that in humans is encoded by the GABRG1 gene. The protein encoded by this gene is a subunit of the GABAA receptor which belongs to the Cys-loop superfamily of ligand-gated ion channel and has a heteropolymeric structure that forms a chloride channel.

Basic Information of GABRG1
Protein Name Gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit gamma-1
Gene Name GABRG1
Aliases GABA(B) receptor subunit gamma-1
Organism Homo sapiens (Human)
UniProt ID Q8N1C3
Transmembrane Times 4
Length (aa) 465
Sequence MGPLKAFLFSPFLLRSQSRGVRLVFLLLTLHLGNCVDKADDEDDEDLTVNKTWVLAPKIHEGDITQILNSLLQGYDNKLRPDIGVRPTVIETDVYVNSIGPVDPINMEYTIDIIFAQTWFDSRLKFNSTMKVLMLNSNMVGKIWIPDTFFRNSRKSDAHWITTPNRLLRIWNDGRVLYTLRLTINAECYLQLHNFPMDEHSCPLEFSSYGYPKNEIEYKWKKPSVEVADPKYWRLYQFAFVGLRNSTEITHTISGDYVIMTIFFDLSRRMGYFTIQTYIPCILTVVLSWVSFWINKDAVPARTSLGITTVLTMTTLSTIARKSLPKVSYVTAMDLFVSVCFIFVFAALMEYGTLHYFTSNQKGKTATKDRKLKNKASMTPGLHPGSTLIPMNNISVPQEDDYGYQCLEGKDCASFFCCFEDCRTGSWREGRIHIRIAKIDSYSRIFFPTAFALFNLVYWVGYLYL

Function of GABRG1 Membrane Protein

The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and the site of action of a number of important pharmacological agents including barbiturates, benzodiazepines, and ethanol. Until now, nineteen heterogeneous subunits of the GABAA receptor (6 α, 3 β, 3 γ, 1 δ, 1 ε, 1 θ, 1 π, and 3 ρ) have been identified, with 70% sequence homology within classes and 30% homology between classes. Functional receptors are pentameric, with the receptor usually comprised of 2 α subunits, 2 β subunits, and one γ subunit. These subunits assemble as pentamers and, as for many other ion channels, their biophysical and pharmacological properties are dependent on the subunit stoichiometry. As a member of the GABA receptors, GABRG1 has been reported to be involved in mediating responses to benzodiazepines. What’s more, studies have shown that GABRG1 is expressed in the rat vestibule, indicating that GABA is one of the important neurotransmitters in the vestibular system.

GABAA receptor morphology. (A) Structure of a GABAAR subunit. (B)Schematic view of most common GABAA isoform (putative) from the synaptic cleft. Fig.1 GABAA receptor morphology. (A) Structure of a GABAAR subunit. (B)Schematic view of most common GABAA isoform (putative) from the synaptic cleft. (Gurba, 2010)

Application GABRG1 of Membrane Protein in Literature

  1. Ittiwut C., et al. GABRG1 and GABRA2 variation associated with alcohol dependence in African Americans. Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research. 2012, 6(4):588-93. PubMed ID: 21919924

    This article reflects the interrelationship between these 2 genes (GABRG1 and GABRA2) and the likelihood that risk loci exist in each of them.

  2. Ray L.A and Hutchison K.E. Associations among GABRG1, level of response to alcohol, and drinking behaviors. Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research. 2009, 33(8):1382-90. PubMed ID: 19426171

    This article aims to investigate allelic associations between 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the GABRG1 gene (rs1391166 and rs1497571) and alcohol phenotypes, namely level of response to alcohol, alcohol use patterns, and alcohol-related problems. It suggests that genetic variation at the GABRG1 locus may underlie the expression of alcohol phenotypes, including the level of response to alcohol.

  3. Enoch M.A., et al. GABRG1 and GABRA2 as independent predictors for alcoholism in two populations. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2009, 34(5):1245. PubMed ID: 18818659

    This article suggests that there are likely to be independent, complex contributions from both GABRG1 and GABRA2 to alcoholism vulnerability.

  4. Esmaeili A., et al. GABAA receptors containing gamma1 subunits contribute to inhibitory transmission in the central amygdala. Journal of neurophysiology. 2009, 101(1):341-9. PubMed ID: 19004994

    This article indicates that in the basolateral amygdala, GABAergic synapses are likely composed of receptors that contain alpha2betaxgamma2 subunits. In the central amygdala receptors at the medial input, carrying afferents from the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis contain similar receptors, whereas in the lateral input GABA receptors likely contain gamma1 subunits.

  5. Cheng H and Kong W. Expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor gamma 1 subunit in the end-organs of rat vestibule. Lin chuang er bi yan hou ke za zhi= Journal of clinical otorhinolaryngology. 2003, 17(4):229-30. PubMed ID: 12838869

    This article aims to investigate the expression of the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor gamma 1 subunit in the end-organs of rat vestibule. It shows that gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor gamma 1 subunit is expressed in the rat vestibule, indicating that GABA is one of the important neurotransmitters in the vestibular system.

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Reference

  1. Gurba K N. (2010). Assembly and heterogeneity of GABAA receptors. Venderbilt Reviews Neuroscience. 2, 25-32.

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